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A sunset shot of the Milford State Monument.

A sunset shot of the Milford State Monument.

Just outside of New Ulm, Minnesota, sits the Milford State Monument. I had only heard about this monument; I had never been past New Ulm on County Road 29 until Wednesday, when I had to drive to a speaking engagement in Redwood Falls.

The monument marks the Aug. 18, 1862 killing of more than 50 settlers at the beginning of the U.S.-Dakota War. The settlement of Milford no longer exists. The closest town is Essig.

The female figure is supposed to represent Mercury. The memorial was dedicated in 1929.

The female figure is supposed to represent Mercury. The memorial was dedicated in 1929.

My route from New Ulm to Redwood Falls. This drive was new to me, and the journey at sunset was unbelievable. I forget how flat it is once you get past New Ulm. I could literally see for miles. At one point, the town of Sleepy Eye was several miles away, but yet I could see the majestic twin spires of St. Mary’s Church. If you zoom into the map, you will see the Milford Monument about three miles outside of New Ulm, at the intersection of County Roads 29 and 11.

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As this sign notes, the survivors fled to New Ulm to warn citizens there that the Dakota were on their way. If you want to know more about the war, check out this website.

A plaque that lists those killed.

A plaque that lists those killed.

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Someone left a beer can behind. Classy.

Someone left a beer can behind. Classy.

Because nothing says family picnic like the site of a massacre. I found the presence of this picnic table and grill odd.

Because nothing says family picnic like the site of a massacre. I found the presence of this picnic table and grill odd.

milford 11The timing of my arrival at the Milford Monument was not planned, but it was perfect–about 10-15 minutes before sunset on a clear day.

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