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The headline on a news story I read a couple of weeks ago.

The headline on a news story I read a couple of weeks ago.

Even the gravedigger must weep at times. The same goes for funeral directors, pastors, doctors, etc. — anyone in a profession that deals with death. For the most part, these workers keep their composure, but that is next to impossible when dealing with the death of children, especially the deaths of 132 children in a Pakistani school in December.

One man, Taj Muhammed, buried all those bodies with the help of his two sons.

“During my more than 30 years of doing this job, I have buried countless, maybe hundreds or thousands of bodies here in this vast graveyard, but as I remember I wept only when I was burying my mother several years ago,” he said.

He did not ask for money for his services.

It was like burying his own children, he said. “How could I ask or receive money for making the grave of my own child?”

More proof that we live in a small world, one in which we are all human despite our surface differences of skin color, religion, culture, and ethnicity. Gravediggers, whether in Pakistan or Waseca, will weep on occasion. Gravediggers, whether in Pakistan or Waseca, will not ask for money to bury a child.

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